Book Review: ‘Flash of Darkness’ by Toneye Eyenot

A fascinating study of evil.

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Toneye Eyenot Flash of Darkness‘Flash of Darkness’ delivers a series of fascinating vignettes that give the reader glimpses into the nature of evil. It’s both thought-provoking and chilling in the portrayal of evil as rational and reasoned in the minds of the beings that do its will. These stories are beautifully written, with vivid imagery and a dark eloquence that really enhances the themes and key ideas of the stories. At times macabre, at other times reflective and morose, this is a book that enables the reader to look at life through a darker lens.
Acorn Award I Golden

I have awarded this book a Gold Acorn.

Find your copy here.

Book Review: ‘Familiar Betrayal’ by Lucretia Stanhope

The fourth book in Stanhope’s Elemental Witch Trials series does not disappoint.

Lucretia Stanhope EWT 4The fourth book in Lucretia Stanhope’s Elemental With Trials series, ‘Familiar Betrayal’ takes Gwen and the reader deeper into the darkness, not only of magic and the use of power by various entities, but also of her own desire for vengeance and quest for justice.  Her need to resolve issues of the past before giving birth adds an urgency to the unfolding of the story, and means that Gwen is forced to ponder consequences that cannot be predicted, and to make decisions whose outcomes remain to be revealed.

There is much at stake for Gwen, but also for the realms that battle one another for supremacy. The tension in this book comes not only form waiting to see how Her personal circumstances work out, but also from Gwen’s questions about whether or not she can make any real difference, or if she is merely trading off one form of evil against another.

While some of the issues and problems of the past are resolved, Gwen finds herself confronted with new and significant challenges. Even when things seem to be going well, the reader is still aware of the tension that exists both within Gwen and in the worlds in which she lives. Her character continues to evolve with experience and knowledge, making her both admirable and a positive model in the reader’s eyes.

I thoroughly enjoyed reading this book. Stanhope has yet again ensured that the story is gripping and interesting as it progresses into each new phase.

Acorn Award II Silver
Familiar Betrayal has been awarded a Silver Acorn.

Find your copy here.

 

Book Review: ‘The Chartreuse Spirit’ by India Emerald

India Emerald The Chartreuse Spirit
This is an intriguing story which appears at first to consist of separate and quite distinct observations and reflections from Verity and Peter during a time in which they are separated by Peter’s investigation of a case. The reader does not understand these recollections to be convergent at all until, at some indistinct point, they realise that the two characters’ accounts both relate to the same mystery.

 

It’s very cleverly constructed, and while it does work as a standalone, the reader can gain considerable understanding of the context of this story and its central characters by reading ‘Hope’s Well’ by the same author.

Acorn Award II Silver

This is a great short read that can be enjoyed in the space of a lunch break. Book Squirrel has awarded it a Silver Acorn.

 

Book Review: ‘A Shape On The Air’ by Julia Ibbotson

This brilliant story is an absolutely enthralling blend of historical fiction, fantasy, and science fiction.

Julia Ibbotson A Shape On The Air

 

This brilliant story is an absolutely enthralling blend of historical fiction, fantasy, and science fiction.

 

Drawn into the life of Vivianne Du Lac, history professor, the reader is almost immediately plunged into an intricate web of complications, challenges and unexpected developments that are woven together so that no strand of the story is independent of the others. The narrative is smooth and well-constructed, and Ibbotson’s writing is excellent.

 

The characters are very well crafted, especially given that each fits into more than one story strand. Viv is the most complex and detailed of them all, being the central character, but the others are all given depth through their interactions and responses as the story progresses.

 

More than simply being enjoyable, this is a thought-provoking and involving read in which the reader becomes completely engrossed. Acorn Award I Golden

 

‘A Shape On The Air’ has been awarded a Gold Acorn.

 

Get your copy at Amazon.

Book Review: ‘Forest of Ancestors’ by K.A. Denver

Book Squirrel Review: ‘Forest of Ancestors’ by K.A. Denver

K.A. Denver Forest of Ancestors

 

This is a great story which holds a good level of mystery and intrigue that develops at a good pace as the plot progresses. The differences between light and dark magic, and the ways in which each character uses their magic, add interest and complexity to the story. The central characters are varied and quite well crafted although, as a reader, I didn’t really feel as connected to most of them as I would have liked to.

 

I really like the concept of the forest of ancestors as a place of memory as well as of magic, and the ways in which that setting is portrayed and developed in the story. The images were formed quite vividly in my mind as I read, and it was good to see the characters fully engaging with, and responding to, this special element of their environment in personal ways.

 

My one criticism – and it is a real annoyance as a reader – is that there were places in which the writing really needed more thorough editing to remove quite obvious errors that remain in the text. A less fastidious reader might not notice all of them, but a couple of them were quite glaring and should never have made it to the final manuscript.

 

Overall, though, I did enjoy this book. It has some quite original elements and surprising turns that complement the strong storyline.

 

Acorn Award II Silver
I’ve awarded ‘Forest of Ancestors’ a Silver Acorn because, despite its flaws, it is a great read.

 

Get your copy at Amazon.

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Book Review: ‘All The Nothing We’ve Done’ by Christina McMullen

If you died suddenly and were confronted with the reality of having to justify your deeds to get into heaven, what would you say?

 Christina McMullen All The Nothing We've Done.jpg
If you died suddenly and were confronted with the reality of having to justify your deeds to get into heaven, what would you say?

 

‘All The Nothing We’ve Done’ revolves around this very question in a light-hearted and often humorous way, yet it is an interesting and thought-provoking read.

 

The reader is reminded that what one person considers sinful might be seen as virtuous by another – perspective and interpretation are key factors in how we view and evaluate others actions, or our own.

Acorn Award II Silver

I enjoyed this short story very much, and am pleased to award it a Silver Acorn.

 

Find it on Amazon.

Book Review: ‘Reaper’s Folly’ by Nikki Landis

A fascinating exposition of a truly evil mind.

Nikki Landis Reapers Folly
Not since C.S. Lewis’ brilliant book ‘The Screwtape Letters’ have I read such a fascinating exploration of a truly evil, devilish mind, where even his demon followers are the victims of Darkness.

 

‘Reaper’s Folly’ delivers a powerful and emotionally charged story that brings the reader face to face with evil in its darkest forms. Landis’ writing  and story craft is magnificent, with some profound moments of macabre terror. The greatest horror, however, is the realisation that it may, in fact, be true.

 

Acorn Award I GoldenThis terrific book has been awarded a Gold Acorn for excellence.

 

Find it on Amazon.