Book Review: ‘Witch Moon’ by Kat Gracey

Plenty of action and intrigue!

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Kat Gracey Witch MoonThis is no ordinary paranormal romance with a little mystery thrown in. It’s a story as conflicted as you can get, complicated by secrets, personal agendas, and age-old enmity. There is plenty of action and intrigue to keep the reader in suspense right until the end of the book.

Anna and Charlie are both likeable characters, and having the story told from their alternate points of view enables the reader to develop familiarity with the thoughts and feelings of both. Between them, they have flaws and complications enough, but their backgrounds certainly create nigh-impossible odds for the relationship between them. Even so, throughout the book, one finds oneself hoping that it works out for them, despite having little optimism that it can. The resolution of the story is powerful not only in the way the drama plays out, but also in the realisations that make Anna understand her situation.

The book is really well written, delivering the story with a narration that is energetic and well-paced, keeping the reader guessing and turning those pages to see what happens next.

Acorn Award I Golden

For all those reasons, this book has been awarded a Gold Acorn.

Find your copy here.

Series Review: ‘Lineage’ by C H Clepitt

Highly original and wickedly brilliant.

This is a marvellous series of three paranormal short story reads. The writing is witty and laced with dark humour, the characters are quite unique and yet seem to belong together in a “shabby chic” kind of way, and the stories are enormously entertaining.

Clepitt writes with a trademark brand of cynical dark humour, and there are some gems of observation about society and people in general embedded in these stories of urban vampires making a life for themselves in 21st century England.

Each story is short enough to read in one sitting, and the overall story arc enjoys good continuity and development of both the characters and the challenges they face from one to the next.Acorn Award I Golden

The ‘Lineage’ series has been awarded a Gold Acorn for originality and wickedly brilliant storytelling.

 

Book Review: ‘The Trouble with Antlers’ by A.J. Culey

A fun read for MY and YA readers.

A.J. Culey Shifter High 1‘The Trouble With Antlers’ is the first in A.J. Culey’s Shifter High series. The premise and storyline of the book are fun: what happens when humans move to a town populated entirely by shifters? It makes for an entertaining read, enriched with situational comedy and a good number of lighthearted moments to balance those full of teen angst and embarrassment.

While the series is written for a young adult audience, this book proved to be both enjoyable and interesting for this adult reader. While it may not have the depth and heart-in-your-throat moments that something like Harry Potter has, that’s not necessarily a bad thing: a reader doesn’t always have the energy or the desire to have their heart broken seven times or more in each sitting.
Acorn Award II Silver

If you’re looking for a light read that is fun and engaging, this is a great choice. As such, it has been awarded a Silver Acorn.

Find the series here.

Book Review: ‘When Shadows Dance’

A really well crafted short story.

2018-08-09 18.32.03.pngThis is a beautifully written, well balanced story full of contrasts: light and shadow, age and youth, mishap and design. It has some almost Gothic elements and a finely tuned sense of foreboding that builds as the story unfolds, with a few neat little twists along the way, that are nicely balanced by its poignant and wistful moments.

It’s quite a short read at 18 pages, but one that proved to be a delightful diversion in a busy day.Acorn Award I Golden

‘When Shadows Dance’ has been awarded a Gold Acorn.

Get your copy here.

Book Review: ‘Return of the Sleeping Warriors’ by Petra Costa

A brilliant Australian YA #urbanfantasy read.

Petra Costa Return of the Sleeping Warriors 1The first book in the ‘When Magic Awakes’ series, this book starts by dropping the reader right into a situation of tension and mystery that continues to grow and develop further as the story progresses. One by one, the questions are layered and woven together so that before long, the reader realises that this book simply demands to be read.

Michael and Dana appear to be typical teenagers living in suburban Melbourne. Sport and school consume most of their time, but there’s something else going on that intrigues both the central characters and the reader. Their family seems quite normal and their dislike of the nasty neighbours seems completely natural.

There is, however, much more to both sides of the equation than meets the eye.

As the action of the story progresses, the reader becomes very familiar with both Michael and Dana, their family members, and the flaws and strengths of each. The reader is very much inclined to cheer Michael and Dana on as they confront a set of circumstances that they never expected to meet in suburban Melbourne.

I really enjoyed the typical Australian flavour of the settings in the story and also in the writing. I find that, too often, Australian authors feel they need to sacrifice their ow surroundings and way of speaking in deference to the power of American popular culture. The author has, in this book, not only retained those qualities but also incorporated them as part of the strengths of the settings, characters and story.Acorn Award I Golden

I found this to be an excellent and interesting book, with plenty of action and excitement to engage YA readers and older, so I have awarded it a Gold Acorn.

I have also added Petra Costa to my list of “one-click” authors, whose books I shall buy without hesitation.

Find your copy here.

Book Review: ‘The Dragonheart Stories: Fairy Tales for Grownups’ by Jane Jago

A magnificent adults-only collection of dragon stories!

Jane Jago The Dragonheart StoriesOne of my favourite things to discover is a book that gives the reader a sense of the author’s own personality. The incidental humour and quirky characters in these stories are evidence of a creative mind brimming with ideas and unafraid to follow them wherever they lead.

The Dragonheart Stories Is a brilliant collection of short stories that are imaginative, sensual and highly original — and definitely not for children! Very conservative readers would probably not appreciate them either, although this reader considers that to be very much to their own loss. The stories are much like the nature of their dragon characters: magnificent, beautiful, rowdy, complex, and at times aggressive, but at the same time filled with insight. Each story is both entertaining and thought-provoking. The narration instils in the reader a sense of reverence for the dragons, but also considerable affection for the central characters.

Acorn Award I Golden

I really hope there are more of these stories to come. It is only fitting that this humble squirrel should pay these wonderful dragons tribute with a Golden Acorn.

Find your copy here.

Book Review: ‘Lineage: The Memory Of The Sphinx’ by C H Clepitt

If you enjoy subversive dark humour, don’t overlook this series of short reads.

CH Clepitt Lineage The Memory of the SphinxThe third of C.H. Clepitt’s paranormal short stories in the Lineage series, this is another entertaining short read.

Clepitt continues to develop the quirky characters introduced in the first two stories, and adds another level of complexity by both providing a new development in the story and intertwining it with both John’s and Charlotte’s separate backstories.

This story is told with the author’s trademark cynical humour, which adds a delightful layer of snark to an otherwise dark story.

If you enjoy subversive dark humour, don’t overlook this series of short reads.Acorn Award II Silver

I did want it to be longer, and I wanted more resolution to the minor parts of this story, so I have awarded ‘Lineage: The Memory Of The Sphinx’ a Silver Acorn.

Find your copy here.