Book Review: ‘Journey of a Lost Manuscript’ by Lorraine Smith

A fascinating true story of the discovery of a Tudor document in 21st century Australia.

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Lorraine Smith Journey of a Lost ManuscriptThis is a fascinating true story of a vellum manuscript from Tudor times, its discovery in a bookshop in Warrnambool in 2013, and the journey of discovery undertaken by Lorraine Smith to learn of the manuscript’s history.

It’s really well-written with an easy-going, conversational tone that makes the reader feel as though they’re just listening to the author tell her story, so it’s very relaxing and enjoyable to read. The reader gets a good feel for the character of the author as well as the different personalities she has encountered in the course of her investigations.
The story is complemented by very clear and interesting photographs and maps.

Because it is such an interesting read, ‘Journey of a Lost Manuscript’ has been awarded a Gold Acorn.Acorn Award I Golden

Find your copy on Amazon or contact Spectrum Books in Warrnambool, Australia.

Book Review: ‘Country of Daughters – Daughters Inn’ by Bijou Li

An interesting cross-cultural read.

Bijou Li Country of Daughters Daughters InnThis is a story of cultures confronting one another and the tension between tradition and innovation that follows. When a young woman travels to work in a traditional community that has just begun to embrace tourism, she discovers the different interests and motivations that cause ripples and turbulent undercurrents in Lugu Lake.

Written from the perspective of a Chinese woman who studied these communities, the reader can sense the authenticity of the both the narrative, which offers a profound exploration of the experiences of the people and the problems caused by significant differences in thinking. This is a fascinating study of the development of a traditional Chinese town and its people, something that most western readers certainly have very little idea about, yet at the same time, it reminds the reader that human nature doesn’t actually change much wherever you go. It’s also a timely reminder of what happens when economic concerns take precedence over environmental and social considerations, and the impact that has on both place and people.
Acorn Award II Silver

It’s an intriguing and thought-provoking story, which I very much enjoyed. I’ve awarded it a Silver Acorn.

Find your copy here.

Book Review: ‘Can’t Sit – Living With A Sitting Disability’ by Rick Lunkenheimer

This book is the story of Rick Lunkenheimer’s battle with chronic pain and the impact it has had on his life.

Rick Lunkenheimer Can't Sit

The author tells his story in a straightforward and knowledgeable way, explaining the conditions he suffers and the consequences they carry in a way that informs and educated the reader without asking for sympathy. As a reader who also suffers chronic pain conditions, this is really important to me: the goal of speaking about invisible illnesses must always be increased awareness among the audience, rather than making excuses or seeking pity.

The points made about social acceptance and understanding are relevant to all “invisible illnesses”. It’s great to have a book like this for people to read so that they gain a better understanding of other people’s lives and situations. This, in turn, will result in greater acceptance and less judgement of those who are so often misunderstood as a result of ignorance.

The book is well written and the author’s story is both personal and highly informative. The personal vulnerability that comes with recounting one’s own experiences so honestly is enormous, so I genuinely appreciate the honesty and bravery required to write this book.
Acorn Award I Golden

Because this book is well written, tells an inspiring story and offers good advice, it has been awarded a Gold Acorn.

Get your copy at Amazon.