Book Review: ‘Falling For Elizabeth Bennet’ by Debra Ann Kummoung

A new reinvention of Pride and Prejudice – don’t expect the same story!

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In this reinvention of ‘Pride and Prejudice’, the author has reworked the same characters and some elements of the story to create an original work based on Austen’s classic, but not consistent with it. I did enjoy some of these new twists and turns, and appreciated the author’s exploration of the stigma associated with epilepsy in the 18th century. 

I found myself conflicted not by these alterations, but by the fact that the entire story is written in present tense, which gives the story the feeling of a running commentary rather than a developed storyline. While that may be a matter of personal preference, I didn’t feel as though the narration did justice to the storyline or the important ideas the author wanted to develop and explore.

I also found it odd that the characters kept on using each other’s names every time they spoke during a conversation, which felt stilted and quite redundant. 

All in all, this was an enjoyable enough read, but probably better for a reader less fussy about writing style than I am. 


Falling for Elizabeth Bennet has been awarded a Bronze Acorn. 

Find your copy here

Book Review: ‘I Wore Heels To The Apocalypse’ by CH Clepitt

A most enjoyable, quirky read.

‘I Wore Heels To The Apocalypse’ is a quirky and satirical twist on the post-apocalyptic genre. This is a most entertaining story, laced with Clepitt’s trademark humour, twisted storylines and highly memorable characters that are interesting, diverse, and well-developed.

I enjoyed this book as an audiobook, but it’s also available as a paperback or ebook.  The narration is excellent, adding depth and personality to the characters in a way that further developed the humour of the story itself.

‘I Wore Heels To The Apocalypse’ has been awarded a Gold Acorn.

Find your copy here.

Book Review: ‘Thorns‘ by Lucretia Stanhope

Another great read in an excellent paranormal series.

This seventh book in the Elemental Witch Trials series focuses on Rose, Brac’s daughter, take over as the main character, Brac still features prominently in the story, while Gwen and other family members continue to take supporting roles. Once again, the author achieves a natural and smooth progression that enriches the series without losing continuity or cutting off the stories of other family members.

Rose is a formidable character, not afraid to use both her physical and inner strengths to achieve her goals. She is complex and conflicted, which adds a very relatable layer of depth to her story.

As with every other instalment of this excellent series, I thoroughly enjoyed this book.

Thorns has been awarded a Gold Acorn.

Find your copy here.

Book Review: ‘Alaska Man: A Memoir of Growing Up And Living In The Wilds Of Alaska’ by George Davis

51SevJLenUL._SY346_It takes a particular kind of person to embrace the challenges of living in the more isolated parts of coastal Alaska, and to not only survive but thrive on the landscape and lifestyle that it presents.

George Davis has certainly proven himself to be up to the challenge throughout the years. His experiences are varied and interesting, and his story is told in a conversational way that is enjoyable and easy to read.

‘Alaska Man’ has been awarded a Bronze Acorn. Acorn Award III Bronze

Find your copy here.

Book Review: ‘Starblazer: Through The Black Gate’ by Reiter

A really enjoyable sci-fi epic.

Reiter Starblazer
‘Starblazer’ is a genuine sci-fi epic, action packed and loaded with conflict, power struggle and suspense. The world building is incredible, immersing the reader in a realm that is both fantastic and believable at the same time. The writing is clean and the story is coherent and really well developed.

The real strength, though, lies in the characters. Their flaws balance their abilities and strengths in a way that makes them believable and still complex enough to remain unpredictable. The subversive humour that emerges in certain characters is refreshing and very engaging.

In contrast to the stereotypes of science fiction, which I acknowledge as the main reason I read less of it that I otherwise might, I really liked the fact that the female characters are central to this story, They are intelligent, self-sufficient and powerful in their own right.

This is a big book, but it’s a real page-turner with an entertaining story and lots of action and energy.Acorn Award I Golden

Starblazer has been awarded a Gold Acorn.

Find your copy here.

Book Review: ‘Bea & Bee’ by Sylva Fae

A bea-utiful book for young children and family reading.

Sylva Fae Bea and BeeIn an era where bees are endangered and many children seem not to take time away from screens of one type or another to enjoy the pleasures of a garden, this book is a breath of fresh air.

The concept of the story seems simple – a little girl longs for a puppy and finds an unusual alternative – but there is an underlying message of hope and acceptance in this story that is very positive and encouraging for children. It is a very good thing to open our children’s minds to things that are out of the ordinary, and to teach them that even among friends who are very different, we can have surprising similarities.

The illustrations are cheerful, colourful and varied so that the book remains engaging for younger readers throughout the story.

This story also comes with helpful information about how to provide for bees in the garden and avoiding some of the things that might be harmful to them.

This would be a delightful book for families to read together, or for more independent reading as children get a little older. It would also be a valuable addition to school and town libraries.Acorn Award I Golden

‘Bea & Bee’ has been awarded a Gold Acorn.

Find your copy here.

Book Review: ‘Tempered Fury‘ by Lucretia Stanhope

Another brilliant read in an excellent paranormal series.

The sixth book in the Elemental Witch Trials series sees Brac take over as the central character, with his mother Gwen and other family members in supporting roles. This is quite a natural and smooth progression, and one that I felt was timely in the overall story of the series. It’s interesting and exciting for the reader to see this generational change and to learn how Gwen’s qualities and powers have been passed on in her children and grandchildren.

The evolution of Brac is both fascinating and satisfying, as the reader begins to see beneath his impulsive and superficial exterior to what is really underneath. The development of the next generation is also very interesting, and the reader can only begin to guess what challenges and exploits await these new characters.

The story still has sufficient continuity with the previous books in the series to maintain the flow of the overall series, but this book is also sufficiently detailed in terms of back story so that a reader unfamiliar with the series could still enjoy it and understand enough of the context to fully enjoy the book.

It is an excellent series though, and I have thoroughly enjoyed each instalment so far, so I really do encourage readers to start at the beginning.

Tempered Fury has been awarded a Gold Acorn.

Find your copy here.